Feedback Loup: College Panel

We recently hosted a panel of 8 college students from the University of Minnesota. The goal was to better understand how millennials think about social media, communications, video, VR, AR, the selfie generation, the future of work, and privacy. Here’s a summary of what we learned:

Text Is Dying

  • Quote: “Texting replaced email, and photos have replaced text messages”.
  • Message: Text is being used less frequently by each of our panelists. They view text as a formal way to communicate. Snap, Facebook and Instagram are the preferred communication platforms, with Facebook settings being switched to photos only. The panelists mentioned tech platforms promoting messaging within games as a way to maintain usage.
  • Takeaway: Text is slowly going away, replaced by video and photos. Text is viewed more as a formal way to communicate.

Fake News

  • Quote: “I like Snap for news.”
  • Message: Our panelists get their news from a wide variety of sources. 7 of 8 panelists are not concerned about fake news. Snap was the most popular way to aggregate news from traditional sources (3 of 8), followed by mainstream news outlets; e.g., CNN and WSJ.
  • Takeaway: Professional news is still respected but not paid for by these college students.

The Future of Work

  • Quote: “It’s scary. If we can’t have cashiers, truckers and fast food jobs. . . how will people live?”
  • Message: College students know they are entering a workforce that will have dramatic changes over the next 30 years. They have concerns about who’s going to control everything as resources become more concentrated. The University of Minnesota offers a class titled “Size of the Future” that addresses the risk of job loss to automation. The group did consider these changes when thinking about a career, with an increased interest in a more technical education that feels more defensible. Ultimately these students believe that the negative impact of lost jobs will be partially offset by the positive impact of new industries being formed.
  • Takeaway: College students understand that the workforce is changing. They envision social challenges emerging from displacement of workers with lower levels of education. But they believe a college education will ensure that their futures are safe.

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When Will Apple Win Its First Oscar?

We think Apple will win an Oscar in the next five years. That’s how long it will take for Apple to scale its original content spend from less than $200m today to $5-7b. The reason why expect $5-7b in Apple original content spend in five years is because Apple must catch up to Netflix and Amazon, the former of which will likely be spending more than $10b per year at that point. Before diving more into the question, here are a few key data points that we think are relevant to the discussion:

  • Amazon recently beat rival Netflix to be the first streaming service to receive significant Academy Award acknowledgement for Manchester By The Sea, with 6 nominations including one for best picture.
  • Netflix has received a total of five Oscar nominations, all in the best documentary category, since it began purchasing the rights to original content.
  • Apple is serious about content. The company will debut two exclusive shows, “Planet of the Apps” and “Carpool Karaoke”, this spring on the Apple Music platform.
  • Revenue from Apple’s Services segment, including the iTunes Store and Apple Music, is a key growth driver for Apple over the next several years. See more on Apple’s Services business in our piece, The 5 Focuses, which outlines Apple’s top five priorities, including Services.
  • We expect 2017 original content spend of about $7b from Netflix, and $6b from Amazon. Amazon includes a la cart cost.  Excluding a la cart we estimate Amazon original content spend is $4b. While we expect Apple to increase its content spend gradually over several years, the company has more than enough resources to participate in the same way.

As we’ve written before, we believe Apple innovates by taking small but deliberate steps forward (see our piece on Apple’s baby steps here). They did it with the iPod, they did it again with the iPhone and the iPad, and we see them doing the same in original content for their entertainment platforms. On their most recent earnings call, Tim Cook said, “In terms of original content, we’ve put our toe in the water doing some original content for Apple Music, and that will be rolling out throughout the year. We’re learning from that, and we’ll go from there.” His comments remind us of the way the company has talked about Apple TV for the last decade, often describing their work in the category as “pulling a string” to see where it leads.

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