AirPods Are More Important Than The Apple Watch

At this point, it might not even be that crazy to say it, but we think AirPods are going to be a bigger product for Apple than the Watch. After using AirPods for the past month, the Loup Ventures team is addicted. The seamlessness in connecting and disconnecting with our phones and enabling Siri has meaningfully improved the way we work and consume content. AirPods are a classic example of Apple not doing something first, but doing it better. And they look cool. We think there are three reasons that AirPods are more important than the Apple Watch.

AI-First World
Google has been talking about designing products for an AI-first world for about a year now. In our view, an AI-first world is about more natural interfaces for our screen-less future. Speech is an important component of the next interface. Siri, Alexa, Google Assistant, and Cortana are making rapid improvements in terms of voice commands they understand and what they can help us with.

We view AirPods as a natural extension of Siri that will encourage people to rely more on the voice assistant. As voice assistants become capable of having deeper two-way conversations to convey more information to users, AirPods could replace a meaningful amount of interaction with the phone itself. By contrast, using Siri on the Apple Watch is less natural because it requires you to hold it up to your face. Additionally, the screen is so small that interaction with it and information conveyed by it is not that much richer than an AI voice-based interface.

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The Five Senses of Computing

The trend in computing towards more natural user interfaces is unmistakable. Graphical user interfaces have long been dominant, but machines driven by more intuitive inputs, like touch and voice, are now mainstream. Today, audio, motion, and even our thoughts, are the basis for the most innovative computer-user interaction models powered by advanced sensor technology. Each computing paradigm maps to one or more of the five human senses; exploring each sense gives us an indication of the direction in which technology is heading.

Sight – Graphical User Interface

The introduction of the graphical user interface (GUI) drove a step function change in computers as productivity tools, because users could rely heavily on sight, our dominant sense. The GUI was then carried forward and built on with the advent of touchscreen devices. The next frontier for visual user interfaces lies in virtual reality and augmented reality. Innovations within these themes will further carry forward the GUI paradigm. VR and AR rely heavily on sight, but combine it more artfully with other inputs like audio, motion, and touch to create immersive interfaces.

Touch – Touchscreen Devices

PCs leveraged basic touch as a foundational input via the keyboard and the mouse. The iPhone then ushered in a computing era dominated by touch, rejecting the stylus in favor of, as Steve Jobs put it, “the best pointing device in the world” – our fingers.  Haptics have pushed touchscreen technology further, making it more sensory, but phones and tablets fall well short of truly immersive computing. Bret Victor summarized the shortcomings of touchscreen devices in his 2011 piece, A Brief Rant on the Future of Interaction Design, which holds up well to this day.

More fully integrating our sense of touch will be critical for the user interfaces of the future. We think that haptic suits are a step we will take on the journey to full immersion, but the best way to trick the user into believing he or she is actually feeling something in VR is to manipulate the neurochemistry of the brain. This early field is known as neurohaptics.

Hearing – Digital Assistants & Hearables

Computers have been capable of understanding a limited human spoken vocabulary since the 1960s. By the 1990s, dictation software was available to the masses. Aside from limited audio feedback and rudimentary speech-to-text transcription, computers did not start widely leveraging sound as an interface until digital assistants began to be integrated into phones.

As digital assistants continue to improve, more and more users are integrating them into their daily routines. In our Robot Fear Index, we found that 43% of Americans had used a digital assistant in the last three months. However, our study of Amazon Echo vs. Google Home showed that Google Home answered just 39.1% of queries correctly vs. the Echo at 34.4%. Clearly we’re early in the transition to audio as a dominant input for computing.

Hearables, like Apple’s AirPods, represent the next step forward for audio as a user interface.

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Investing in Realvision

Today, we’re excited to announce a new investment in Realvision. We see great opportunity in the crossover between AI and VR. The company’s machine learning and computer vision platform creates immersive 3D, VR-ready models for real estate listings. Not only does the platform create immersive models, but also creates an auto-generated floor plan and offers still photos to provide a comprehensive marketing package to enhance real estate listings, creating a better experience for prospective home buyers. Making the real world consumable in VR is a complex but valuable task. We look forward to working with Realvision to change the way we buy real estate.

Disclaimer: We actively write about the themes in which we invest: artificial intelligence, robotics, virtual reality, and augmented reality. From time to time, we will write about companies that are in our portfolio.  Content on this site including opinions on specific themes in technology, market estimates, and estimates and commentary regarding publicly traded or private companies is not intended for use in making investment decisions. We hold no obligation to update any of our projections. We express no warranties about any estimates or opinions we make.

Feedback Loup: College Panel

We recently hosted a panel of 8 college students from the University of Minnesota. The goal was to better understand how millennials think about social media, communications, video, VR, AR, the selfie generation, the future of work, and privacy. Here’s a summary of what we learned:

Text Is Dying

  • Quote: “Texting replaced email, and photos have replaced text messages”.
  • Message: Text is being used less frequently by each of our panelists. They view text as a formal way to communicate. Snap, Facebook and Instagram are the preferred communication platforms, with Facebook settings being switched to photos only. The panelists mentioned tech platforms promoting messaging within games as a way to maintain usage.
  • Takeaway: Text is slowly going away, replaced by video and photos. Text is viewed more as a formal way to communicate.

Fake News

  • Quote: “I like Snap for news.”
  • Message: Our panelists get their news from a wide variety of sources. 7 of 8 panelists are not concerned about fake news. Snap was the most popular way to aggregate news from traditional sources (3 of 8), followed by mainstream news outlets; e.g., CNN and WSJ.
  • Takeaway: Professional news is still respected but not paid for by these college students.

The Future of Work

  • Quote: “It’s scary. If we can’t have cashiers, truckers and fast food jobs. . . how will people live?”
  • Message: College students know they are entering a workforce that will have dramatic changes over the next 30 years. They have concerns about who’s going to control everything as resources become more concentrated. The University of Minnesota offers a class titled “Size of the Future” that addresses the risk of job loss to automation. The group did consider these changes when thinking about a career, with an increased interest in a more technical education that feels more defensible. Ultimately these students believe that the negative impact of lost jobs will be partially offset by the positive impact of new industries being formed.
  • Takeaway: College students understand that the workforce is changing. They envision social challenges emerging from displacement of workers with lower levels of education. But they believe a college education will ensure that their futures are safe.

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Apple Working With Tesla Is A Fairy Tale

There’s been a lot of talk about Apple buying Tesla, but what if Apple simply made a $10 billion equity investment in the company instead? It sounds so good — Apple working with Tesla. In theory, it would make our lives so much better. Imagine all of the things you love about your iPhone, perfectly integrated with all the things Tesla owners rave about. The two tech giants could take over the auto industry over the next 20 years as consumers embrace electric vehicles and automation. Unfortunately, an investment from Apple, nonetheless an acquisition, would be hard to pull off. At the end of the day, that might be better for consumers if not investors.

Before we discuss why it won’t happen, let’s go over why it sounds so good.

For Tesla. A $10 billion cash infusion would all but eliminate any current or future cash problems for the company. While $10 billion equity investment would cause about 20% dilution today, it’s likely it would have a long-term benefit on Tesla stock given the removal of the cash question. Aside from the cash, we believe Apple could and would want to provide resources from their world class hardware, software, and AI teams to make Tesla’s the entertainment system and autopilot better. The investment would likely remove Apple as a potential direct or indirect competitor. Additionally, Tesla’s Model 3 could be showcased in Apple’s 490 retail stores in 20 countries.

For Apple. Investors would feel like they are actually doing something with their cash, which should be a positive for AAPL’s multiple. Apple would be investing in a company that has the potential to be multiple times bigger over the next decade. They would not be spending on the impossible, which would be building its own car to try to catch Tesla, but rather investing in making the leader even better. The impact of AI and robotics on the automotive sector is one of the next mega tech trends, and Apple would have a pole position within that theme.

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