AR Is Coming To Life via Apple’s ARKit

At Apple’s Worldwide Developers Conference in June, the company announced ARKit for developers to create augmented reality-driven apps. Apple describes ARKit as a platform that, “combines device motion tracking, camera scene capture, advanced scene processing, and display conveniences to simplify the task of building an AR experience.”

Now that ARKit has been available to developers for over a month, app demos have started popping up. Apple will likely select a few of the best ARKit apps and highlight them during the fall launch event for iOS 11 and the new iPhone. Until then, we’ll be tracking the demos that surface. Here are a few of our favorite applications:

Measuring Tool. The most-watched ARKit demo shows an AR tape measure.  Users can measure objects in the physical world using an iOS device.  Applications of the technology for remodeling, manufacturing, design, and home repair will be transformational within those sectors.

Ikea recently confirmed a development partnership with Apple to co-build an app that will allow customers to see what Ikea furniture would look like in their homes.  ARKit allows Ikea customers to make “reliable buying decisions,” according to executive Michael Valdsgaard. We see this partnership as the tip of the iceberg for consumer brands and online retailers to solve a real problem that exists today in online shopping.

Gaming.  Developers are keenly aware that AR provides a massive monetary opportunity for gaming, the gaming and entertainment spaces have generated the most ARKit demos to date. Developers, eager to try to replicate the success of the wildly popular Pokémon Go, are diving into game demos. Some of the most noted demos are AR Minecraft and portal travel.

Drawing and Sketching. ARKit will give iOS users the opportunity to draw in 3D using only their device. Laan Labs gives us an insight as to what this could look like.

Ordering Food. The use case for AR in restaurants surprised us. How many times have you ordered something and, once it is set down in front of you, immediately regretted your decision? One ARKit developer has tried to solve that problem.  The app allows customers to explore dishes on the menu before placing an order.

After just 30 days, developers have made a ton of progress with ARKit. For more, and to track developers’ progress, check out the Twitter feed @madewithARKit.

Disclaimer: We actively write about the themes in which we invest: artificial intelligence, robotics, virtual reality, and augmented reality. From time to time, we will write about companies that are in our portfolio. Content on this site including opinions on specific themes in technology, market estimates, and estimates and commentary regarding publicly traded or private companies is not intended for use in making investment decisions. We hold no obligation to update any of our projections. We express no warranties about any estimates or opinions we make.